Local governments have struggled with the best ways to promote and protect trees that add diverse benefits to their communities, including stormwater runoff reduction, carbon sequestration, wildlife habitat, and cleaning the air.  Often regulations that require mitigation for tree cutting are seen as unfair and punitive, and can actually motivate clearing of urban forests before development. 
Collaborating with diverse stakeholders including homebuilders, developers, arborists, planners, landscape architects and community members can help make tree codes that work for all. .
We are hosting a workshop to help local governments improve their urban forestry policies and regulations to motivate steady growth in tree canopy.  We are holding a workshop on November 18 for planners, developers, homebuilders, arborists, community members, and others interested in effective urban forestry codes and programs that increase the benefits of trees in our communities.
Workshop Details:
  • Date: November 18, 2014
  • Cost: $15 + $1.82 service fee (Includes lunch).   Preregistration Required.
  •  Location: Winona Grange, 8340 SW Seneca St, Tualatin, OR 97062
  • Audience: City planners and staff dealing with urban trees or ordinances, elected officials, local developers/home builders, grass-roots organizations, and local NGO’s.
  • Sponsors: Tualatin Riverkeepers, Oregon Department of Forestry, The Intertwine Alliance, Oregon Community Trees, Clean Water Services, Teragan and Associates, Homebuilders Association of Metropolitan Portland, City of Tigard, Tualatin Basin Partners for Clean Water, USDA Forest Service, Bullitt Foundation and Meyer Memorial Trust.
 
Register now at 

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/urban-forestry-summit-creating-effective-policy-for-increasing-tree-canopy-tickets-13031279909

 
Tualatin Riverkeepers thanks the Bullitt Foundation and Meyer Memorial Trust for their support of this and other efforts to protect urban creeks and the Tualatin River through policies that promote urban forestry, green infrastructure and low-impact development.
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